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Jordan

About 2,500 photographs in the collection are of sites in Jordan and are available to publishers, researchers, enthusiasts on reasonable terms. Please look at the images on these pages - if you need a picture of a specific site, context or building, but do not see what you want, contact us.

Most of the aerial photographs of Jordan which Francesca took while a member of David Kennedy's team of his Survey of the Archaeology of Jordan from the air, can be seen at www.flickr.com/search/?w=36925516@N05&q=FFR

Click on the thumbnails to view larger images.

 

Location

Description




Photgrapher
   Long shot of Amman

Amman, capital of Jordan has expanded dramatically in the last 20 years. It is said that it is built over seven hills which are now covered with a sea of white elegant buildings, pink-hued at dawn.


Francesca Radcliffe. FR 02 - 10.9.06
 

Location

Description




Photgrapher
   Jarash

Jarash 50 km north of Amman, is one of the cities of the Decapolis one of the most beautiful and well-preserved provincial Roman towns in the Middle East. The photo shows part of the Roman city from the northeast: the Cardo, main street (bottom right) leading into the oval piazza or Forum; the museum and visitor centre, among the trees (left) and the Macellum or food market (right).
Francesca Radcliffe. FR 35 - 10.9.06
 

Location

Description




Photgrapher
   Qasr Hallabat from the southeast

Qasr Hallabat is 45 km northeast of Amman. Restoration has been undertaken by Spanish archaeologists and the Department of Antiquities of Jordan. The Nabatean settlement became a fort and was enlarged with four corner towers during the Roman period. The Umayyads converted it into a palace, enriching it with marble walls and mosaic floors and building a mosque (top right).
Francesca Radcliffe. FR 41 - 10.9.06
 

Location

Description




Photgrapher
   Amman Citadel from the northwest

Amman, capital of modern Jordan is the ancient Greek and Roman Philadelphia and one of the Decapolis cities. In the background are the remains the Ellenist walls surrounding the citadel and the Greek temple of Hercules, rebuilt by the Romans. The remaining structures are from the Umayyad period: the palace (centre) and surrounding buildings and the huge circular cistern.
Francesca Radcliffe. FR 43 - 18.5.05
 

Location

Description




Photgrapher
   Jarash south Theatre

One of the largest Roman theatres of the Roman province of Syria. Built under the Emperor Domitian it has inscriptions dating it to AD 90-92. There is seating for an audience of 3,000. It has been much restored. Performances are frequently held here especially during the famous Jarash annual Festival. In the background are the Temple of Zeus and the newly restored Hippodrome, top.
Francesca Radcliffe. FR 49 - 10.9.06
 

Location

Description




Photgrapher
   Machaereus or Mukawer

Southeast of Amman, the ruins on the flat top of this conical hill, are said to be of the palace where John the Baptist was killed. The historian Josephus gives a description of this fortified site, which was indeed Herod's palace and tells of the the part it played during the Jewish revolt of AD 66 against the Romans. The photograph shows the remains of the fortifications and the excavated palace.
Francesca Radcliffe. FR 53 - 9.9.06
 

Location

Description




Photgrapher
   Kite near Azrak

These stone-built structures were named "kites" by RAF pilots flying on the Cairo to Baghdad route in the 1920s and are very common in the basalt deserts. They are found in Syria, Jordan, in the Sinai and northern Arabia. Their size varies as does their shape. Recent studies show they may well be animal traps, as their Arabic name masyada implies, for hunting gazelles and ostrich.
Francesca Radcliffe. FR 81 - 17.5.05
 

Location

Description




Photgrapher
   Yajuz. Close-up of an excavated building

Yajuz lies eleven km north of Amman. The rapid and ever increasing expansion of the city is encroaching this substantial settlement on the old Roman Road to Gerasa. Excavations have already revealed early Byzantine churches, an industrial area, wine presses and tombs.
Kennedy & Bewley "Ancient Jordan from the Air", p 205

Francesca Radcliffe. FR 88 - 18.5.05
 

Location

Description




Photgrapher
   Landscape in the Jordan Valley

The Dead Sea is on the top right of the photo. The valley of the Jordan, on average 200 m below see level, is the area of Jordan with the highest rainfall. In recent years it has seen a dramatic intensifying of settlements and new cultivations

Francesca Radcliffe. FR 132 - 9.9.06
 

Location

Description




Photgrapher
   Tree Plantations

In the Jordan valley new plantations form a regular pattern in the sandy landscape.



Francesca Radcliffe. FR 147 - 9.9.06
 

Location

Description




Photgrapher
   Irak al-Amir (ancient Tyros)

This remarkable Hellenist palace lies 17 km west of Amman. The Arabic name for the palace is Qasr al-Abd "Caves of the Prince" and indeed the hillside surrounding it is full of caves. The palace is described by the historian Josephus as a "strong fortress" and was never completed. It is a massive two-storey building built by the Tobiad family, in the early 2nd century BC.
Francesca Radcliffe. FR 206 - 9.9.06
 

Location

Description




Photgrapher
   Wadi es-Sir

The lush valley of Wadi es-Sir, 18 km west of Amman, is where Irak al-Amir lies. The old road which linked Amman to Jerusalem runs along this valley where traces of settlements from early prehistory to the present day can be found.
Kennedy & Bewley "Ancient Jordan from the Air", p 149.


Francesca Radcliffe. FR 222 - 9.9.06
 

Location

Description




Photgrapher
   Olive Tree Plantations

Newly planted trees at the edge of the basalt desert in north east Jordan.




Francesca Radcliffe. FR 252 - 10.9.06
 
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Images Copyright Francesca Radcliffe